What to look for in a network marketing company – part 2

In my first post, I talked about how important it is to choose a company with a product or service you can really get behind.  So, apart from a range of products you can happily use and recommend, what else should you look for?

DSA Member

The Direct Selling Association in the UK and other countries is the industry watchdog, amongst other things.  All reputable MLM companies are members and I wouldn’t look at any company which wasn’t.

Track record, sound financial basis

Does this sound as exciting as ‘get in on the ground floor …’ be the first …’? No. But it does sound like you’ll get paid every month. MLM companies come and go, especially in some parts of the world, and for lots of reasons. The new kid on the block may look glamorous, but that typically means no history, no reputation and a limited support structure, possible teething problems etc. And please watch out for a long ‘pre-launch’ period.  To me, that says ‘not ready yet!’  Great for the trailblazers and gamblers and creates a real buzz, but may not make it.  Of course, every successful company started somewhere and it’s brilliant if you’re in on the ground floor of something massive.  Just be a bit cautious.

Payment system

Unless you’re really into numbers and prepared to spend a lot of time comparing various systems, you’re probably not going to make a useful comparison between the various plans (or, if you’re like me, even understand one of them properly!).  They’re all good as long as you get paid every month.

Just avoid these:

  • any scheme where your payment is kept in a ‘holding account’ until it reaches a certain level or until the company releases it to you. Sound dodgy to you?  It does to me, but there are companies who do this.
  • anyone who tells you that their company’s plan is better/more generous/faster than someone else’s. How do they know? And how will you know?
  • be wary of companies where you reach a certain position but lose it if you don’t maintain a level of sales.  Life happens, you may need to take a break, but you shouldn’t have to keep proving yourself.

International presence

This may not be important to you but, if you have friends and family in other countries or plan to live in another country at some point, check how easy it is to grow your business abroad.  Some companies only operate in their home country.

Finally, avoid like the plague any company which actively encourages their distributors to recruit from other MLM companies.  Yes, it happens and I’ve never understood why.  I wouldn’t be falling over myself to recruit someone who was already unsuccessful and unhappy elsewhere, nor someone looking for where the grass is greener (it’s usually fake or fertilised with bullshit, as I’m sure you know).  To me, it sounds lazy and desperate – what do you think?

Find a good company, work hard and learn and stay with them, it pays off massively.

For more information please check out:

http://www.4livinggroup.co.uk

http://www.facebook.com/4Livingroup/

http://www.aloeisbest.co.uk

 

 

What to look for in a network marketing company – part 1.

I started my network marketing (or Multi-level marketing, MLM, call it what you will) business many years ago.  I had never heard of this way of doing business, I just loved the fact that I could build an income very part-time around my job, and have an escape plan. Now I’m no risk taker and I’m very sceptical, so it still surprises me that I didn’t check it out at all.  I thought it over for a few days, realised that, whatever happened, I’d still have a box of products I could use, and jumped in. After all, I wasn’t signing my life away!

If I had done some checking online, what would I have seen? Some useful information, some opinions, and some really dodgy stuff, mainly from people trying to sell me their sure-fired recipe for success.  You see pretty much the same if you look up all the leading MLM companies.  So it’s just as well that I didn’t look, because I might have said no, which would have been a big mistake.  And it worked out well for me.  Luckily, I joined a reputable, ethical, supportive company with really solid finances and a good track record. But some of my colleagues who loved the business model, had bad experiences before finding our company.  Companies going bust, changing the rules to suit themselves, closing down because the owner had made enough money! And cowboy companies still arrive on the scene, and then disappear taking people’s livelihoods with them, and leaving a lot of disillusioned distributors.

So if you love the business model, and want to find a company which will be right for you, I’ve got a few tips.

  1. Can you get passionate about the company’s product or service? Will you use it yourself? Can you wholeheartedly recommend it?  If not, ask yourself if this is really the right company for you.  You may simply want to recruit lots of people, but that’s not a great way to build a stable business and most companies require a minimum level of sales.  After all, if no one sells anything, there’s no business!  If you’re not recommending your product or service, why should your team? And if you’re not using it yourself, why would anyone you know use it? So choose a company with a product or service that’s relevant to you, and learn to love it.

For more tips about what to look for, read the next instalment! Or, if you can’t wait –

For more information please check out:

http://www.4livinggroup.co.uk

http://www.facebook.com/4Livingroup/

http://www.aloeisbest.co.uk

Top motivational myths, and why we don’t need them. Number three. Spare brain capacity

We only use 10% of our brain. Or do we?

This myth is very attractive; it suggests that there’s a huge hidden part of the human brain just waiting to be unlocked.  It’s a popular science fiction theme in films and books.  In the film ‘Lucy’, Scarlett Johansson plays a  character who is implanted with drugs that allow her to access 100 percent of her brain capacity.  She is able to learn Chinese in an instant, beat up bad guys, and throw cars with her mind (among other new talents).  Morgan Freeman plays neuroscientist Professor Norman, who’s built his career around the 10 percent claim. “It is estimated most human beings use only 10 percent of the brain’s capacity,” he says, “Imagine if we could access 100 percent.”

Of course it’s just not true – we humans use all of our brain at different times.  Brain scans show this very clearly, and they track activity across the whole of the brain.  “Evidence would show over a day you use 100 percent of the brain,” says John Henley, a neurologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.  The brain is only about 3% of our body mass but it uses 20% of our calorie intake – wow, maybe thinking can make me slim!  No organism can afford to give that much to one organ and then only use a tiny part of it.

So where does this idea come from? Various explanations have been put forward, but the most likely one is a simple misunderstanding of early work on how the brain functions.  Only about 10% of brain cells are neurons (the ones that light up on all the scans and transmit information in the brain), the others have different functions. This may be at the bottom of it.  Either way, it’s another myth that you hear quoted all the time.

But what people often mean when they talk about this ‘unused’ part of the brain, is actually the subconscious.  The part of our mind which is outside our control, where our attitudes, moods and habits are found. Accessing that is a whole different ball game, watch this space …..

Ultimately, it’s not that we use 10 percent of our brains, merely that we only understand about 10 percent of how it functions.

For more information please check out:

http://www.4livinggroup.co.uk

http://www.facebook.com/4Livingroup/

http://www.aloeisbest.co.uk